Commonly Used Characters - Intelligent Capture for AP - Foundation 23.1 - Foundation 23.1 - Ready - OnBase - external

Intelligent Capture for AP

Platform
OnBase
Product
Intelligent Capture for AP
Release
Foundation 23.1
License

The following is a list of characters that are commonly used in regular expressions.

Character

Description

\d

Matches any numeric character

\D

Matches any non-numeric character

\s

Matches any white space character (including Tab and Alt characters, ASCII 32 and lower)

\S

Matches any non-white space character

\w

Matches any word character (i.e., A-Z, 0-9, and _)

\W

Matches any non-word character

*

Denotes 0 or more instances of the preceding element

+

Denotes 1 or more instances of the preceding element

?

Denotes 0 or 1 instance of the preceding element

.

Matches any single character (i.e., wildcard)

^

Matches the starting position within the search string

$

Matches the ending position within the search string

[ ]

Matches any single character included in the specified set of characters (e.g., [A-DF] or [ABCDF] would match A, B, C, D, or F)

[^ ]

Matches any single character not included in the specified set of characters (e.g., [^F] would match any character except F)

( )

Denotes a logical grouping of part of an expression, as well as a SubMatch (e.g., if [A-Z]{3}\s(\d{3}) is matched against PSY 101, then 101 is the SubMatch)

{ }

Denotes the minimum and maximum match counts (e.g., in the string ABC1990, ABC\d{2,4} would match ABC19, ABC199, or ABC1990)

|

Separates alternate possibilities (e.g., Bob|Steve would match Bob or Steve)

?:

Denotes that the SubMatch it is contained within will not be stored (e.g., (abc)(?:defg)(123) would only have two SubMatches: abc and 123)